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Medford Clock Shop

"Red sky at night, shepherd's delight,
Red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning"

Barometer Facts and Forcasting

Special Rules to know the changes of weather by marking the the mercury of a barometer
From "A Guide to the Scientific Knowledge of Things Familiar"; by the REV. DR. Brewer. 4th Ed. 1849

E-mail J. Mulhern for more information.


The barometer is highest of all during a long frost; and it generally rises with a north east wind.
The barometer is lowest of all during a thaw, which follows a long frost; and it generally falls with south or west wind.
While the barometer stands above 30, the air must be very dry, or very cold, or perhaps both, - and no rain may be expected.
When the barometer stands very low indeed, there will never be much rain; although a fine day will seldom occur at such times.
In summer-time (after a long continuance of fair weather) the barometer will fall gradually for 2 to 3 days before rain comes: -But if the fall of the mercury is very sudden, a thunder-storm may be expected.
When the sky is cloudless, and seems to promise fair weather, - if the barometer is low, the face of the sky will soon be suddenly overcast.
Dark dense clouds will pass over without rain, when the barometer is high; but if the barometer be low, it will often rain without any appearance of clouds.
The higher the barometer, the greater the probability of fair weather.
When the mercury is in a rising state, fine weather is at hand; but, when the weather is in a sinking state, foul weather is near.
If (in frosty weather) it begins to snow, the barometer generally rises to 30; where it remains so long as the snow continues to fall: If after this, the weather clears up, you may expect very severe cold.
If the rise be sudden, fine weather will not continue long:
If the fall be sudden, foul weather will not continue long.
If the mercury fluctuates much, the weather will be very changeable and unsettled.
Short heavy showers with sudden squalls of wind from the wind from the west when the barometer is unusually low.
The barometer is high when the wind blows between the east and the north; but is low when the wind blows between the south and the west.


The FALL of the barometer

In very hot weather, the fall of the barometer denotes thunder. Otherwise, the sudden falling of the barometer denotes high wind.
In frosty weather, the fall of the barometer denotes thaw.
If wet weather happens soon after the fall of the barometer, expect but little of it.
In wet weather if the barometer falls expect much wet.
In fair weather, if the barometer falls much and remains low, expect much wet in a few days, and probably wind.
N.B. The barometer sinks lowest of all for wind and rain together; next to that wind, (except it be an east or north-east wind).


The RISE of the barometer

In winter, the rise of the barometer presages frost.
In frosty weather, the rise of the barometer presages snow.
If fair weather happens soon after the rise of the barometer, expect but little of it.
In wet weather, if the mercury rises high and remains so, expect continued fine weather in a day or two.
In wet weather, if the mercury rises suddenly very high, fine weather will not last long.
N.B The barometer rises highest of all for north and east winds; for all other winds it sinks.


The barometer UNSETTLED

If the motion of the mercury be unsettled, expect unsettled weather.
If it stand at "MUCH RAIN" and rises to "CHANGEABLE" expect fair weather of short continuance.
If it stand at "FAIR" and fall to "CHANGEABLE", expect foul weather.
N.B. Its motion upwards, indicates the approach of fine weather; its motion downwards, indicates the approach of foul weather.

Medford Clock & Barometer, 3 Union Street, Medford, NJ 08055
Phone: (609) 953-0014, Fax (609) 953-0411
E-mail: jim@medfordclock.com
Copyright 1999 - 2003 Medford Clock Shop. All rights reserved.

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